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Brazil Nuts View larger
Brazil Nuts

Brazil Nuts

Nuts

Buy online natural Brazil nuts with no added salt and no preservatives. 

Every raw material respects our entire supply chain guaranteeing a product with no added sugar and at an affordable price. By purchasing our Brazil nuts you are supporting quality agriculture and people who work on the fields with love, effort and respect. 

You can buy shelled natural Brazil nuts in packs of 1 kg and 2.5 kg, ideal for true nuts lovers. 

Discover the benefits of natural shelled Brazil nuts! Our nutritional analyses have shown that 100 g of Brazil nuts contain: 

  • 371 mg of Magnesium, equivalent to 99% of NRV (Nutrient Reference Value); 
  • 1.81 mg of Copper, equivalent to 181% of NRV; 
  • 225 µg of Selenium, equivalent to 409% of NRV. 

 

Ingredients: BRAZIL NUTS

Formats: 1 kg, 2.5 kg 

Origin: Brazil, Bolivia, Peru 

More details

21,51 €

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Ethical Quality

Convenient Price

Exclusively on Nuturally

Data sheet

IngredientsBRAZIL NUTS. May contain traces of PEANUTS and other NUTS.
Weight1 kg, 2.5 kg
Storage requirementsStore in a cool, dry place
Nutrition declarationaverage nutritional values per 100 g:
EnergykJ 2799 / 679 kcal
Fats65 g
of which saturates16 g
Carbohydrate2.2 g
of which sugars1.8 g
Fibre8.4 g
Protein17.1 g
Salt0.03 g
Copper1.8 mg (180% NRV*)
Selenium225 µg (409% NRV*)
Magnesium371 mg (99% NRV*)
SourceEuro Company analysis
RecommendationsThe advice provided SHOULD IN NO WAY BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE OR PRESCRIPTION. The information provided shall be considered for informative and educational purposes only, it is not intended to replace medical advice. In case of a medical condition, always consult your doctor.
OriginBolivia, Brazil, Peru
NutrientsMagnesium, Copper, Selenium
*NRV: Nutrient Reference Value*Nutrient Reference Value
Label and packagingThe images are for illustrative purposes only, the product may be subject to changes depending on stock availability and selected weight.
ProductNuts

More info

The Bertholletia excelsa, commonly known as Brazil nut or Amazon nut (trade name Brazil Nut) is sourced from the large fruits of a huge tree belonging to the family of the Lecythidaceae, which grows widely in every tropical region, although the larger part of the species is to be found in the neotropics (tropical region of Central and South America), and most notably in the Amazon basin. 

Brazil nuts grow naturally in Venezuela, Guyana, Colombia, Ecuador, Brazil, Bolivia and Peru. However, the trees can also be grown outside its normal habitat: indeed, they can be found in many botanical gardens in Cuba, Sri Lanka, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Ghana and south-west Asia. However, only in Brazil, Bolivia and Peru are Brazilian nut trees produced in such a way that they can be exported. 

The tree can measure more than 50 metres in height and has a trunk that can reach up to two metres in diametre. It is one of those trees defined as emerging in the tropical forest. It can live for 500–800 years. 

The flowers are small, white-yellow and fleshy, and are arranged in panicle inflorescences. Brazil nut flowers have a unique shape not found anywhere else in the world, which does not make pollination easy. Indeed, Brazil nut trees are notable for being pollinated only by a particular species of a very vigorous bees, whose great strength enables them to penetrate the flower. 

The large woody fruits, known in Botany as pixids, are the size of a coconut and can reach over 2 kg in weight. Each fruit contains on average between 12 and 20 clove-shaped seeds. The real nuts also protected by a woody rough shell. Each plant produces an average of 30/40 kilograms of nuts per year. 

In the world nut market, the Brazil nut is the only species which is entirely sourced from wild areas, manually harvesting the fruit. 

The Brazil nut is harvested during the rainy season, from December to March, by local gatherers called castagneros, who temporarily move to the forest, often with their families, for the fruit harvest. Each harvester works along a path or in a forest sector that he or she walks through to collect any fallen fruit. 

In nature, this fruit can only be opened only by an Agutes, a large forest rodent or, over a longer period, by termites. 

The empty shells of the fruit, also called 'Monkey Cups' in some areas, are used by the natives to carry small fires, whose smoke keeps the insects at bay. Farmers also use them to collect the rubber that comes out of the incisions in the bark of the trees of the same name. They are also used for drinking. The unripe seeds are grated to provide a kind of latex, which is used as a form of milk to go with coffee. 

In addition to its use as food, Brazil nut oil is also used as a lubricant for watches, as a dye for artists, and in the cosmetic industry. 

 
Source: 

Nutspaper "Brazil Nut" 2/2009 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazil_nut

 

History

The Bertholletia excelsa, commonly known as Brazil nut or Amazon nut (trade name Brazil Nut) is sourced from the large fruits of a huge tree belonging to the family of the Lecythidaceae, which grows widely in every tropical region, although the larger part of the species is to be found in the neotropics (tropical region of Central and South America), and most notably in the Amazon basin.  

The name of the species, in honour of the French scientist Claude-Louis Berthollet, was first published in 1807 by two botanists, Humboldt and Bonpland, in Plantaeaequinoctiales. In 1874, Miers, in Trans. Linn. SoC. London, presented it instead under the name Bertholletianobilis. Export of Brazil nuts began in the seventeenth century with Dutch merchants. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Amazon nut was exported through two ports of the Pará, which is why it was originally known as Castanha-do-Pará. Only later did the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture give it the name of Castanha-do-Brasil, or Brazil nut. From 1818 it began to be the most important product exported from Pará and, after 1847, its commercialization acquired appreciable economic value. However, export statistics only mention it from 1899 onwards. The Castanha-do-Pará, used in the diet of the indigenous peoples and of small domestic pets, became one of the primary sources of income of this region, giving employment to a great number of workers both in the forest and in the cities. 

Despite its trade name of Brazil Nut, the leading global producer is Bolivia, where it is grown in the Departments of Beni and Pando. The world's two largest processing plants are located in the cities of Riberalta and Cobija. In South America, the forests where the Brazil nut grows cover 20 million hectares. In Peru, the area of production is estimated to be around 1.8 million hectares, concentrated in the eastern part of the Department of Madre di Dios. 30% of the population of this region makes its living from this trade. The business volumes generated by the export of Brazil nuts — which started in the seventeenth century thanks to Dutch merchants — is second in the Amazon only to that of rubber. 

Source: 

Nutspaper "Brazil Nut" 2/2009 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazil_nut  

The advice provided SHOULD IN NO WAY BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE OR PRESCRIPTION. The information provided shall be considered for informative and educational purposes only, it is not intended to replace medical advice. In case of a medical condition, always consult your doctor. 

Properties

According to our analyses, 100 g of Brazil nuts contain:

  • Iron (2.7 mg – 19% NRV)
  • Calcium (156 mg – 20% NRV)
  • Potassium (582 mg – 29% NRV)
  • Zinc (4.3 mg – 43% NRV)
  • Vitamin E (5.3 mg – 44% NRV)
  • Thiamine (0.63 mg – 57% NRV)
  • Manganese (1.2 mg – 60% NRV)
  • Phosphorus (665 mg – 95% NRV)
  • Magnesium (371 mg – 99% NRV)
  • Copper (1.8 mg – 180% NRV)
  • Selenium (225 µg - 409% NRV)
  • Fibre (8.4 g)
  • Unsaturated fatty acids (49 g) and oleic acid (21 g)
  • Linoleic acid (27 g)


Please note that Brazil nuts are included in the list of allergens (Annex 2 Reg. No. 1169/2011 and as amended and extended.)

Dose recommendations

Each pack of 1 kg of Brazil nuts contains about 34 portions of 30 g that provide: 

  • 124% of the Nutrient Reference Value of Selenium; 
  • 54% of the Nutrient Reference Value of Copper; 
  • 30% of the Nutrient Reference Value of Magnesium

 
Individual needs will vary according to age, gender, weight and physical activity. A varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle are the basis of your well-being. 

Affordable price

Affordable price means to us offering our clients Brazil nuts that everybody can enjoy.  
We want, on the one hand, to place the proper value on raw materials in order to obtain a quality product by paying our farmers a fair price; on the other hand, we want to fulfil your needs when it comes to pricing.  

We establish fair long-term relationships with our producers to avoid race-to-the-bottom pricing and that are based on trust as part of our efforts to offer you the finest and most natural product.  

Not only that: by choosing large packs of Brazil nuts you are also contributing to the reduction in the use of plastic. 

 

Storage

You can store Brazil nuts in cool, dry places away from heat and moisture. Here are 4 useful tips: 

  • The ideal way to store Brazil nuts is in a refrigerated environment. Nuturally Brazil nuts can also be stored at room temperature during the winter season due to low temperatures. During summer, however, it is advisable to store the product in the refrigerator or in the coolest possible environment, as increased temperatures could encourage decay. 
  • The ideal container for the storage of Brazil nuts is glass. Indeed, because of its composition it is impervious to chemical agents and gases, and, as it has excellent insulation properties, it holds the initial temperature for longer than other materials. It is even better if the glass is coloured: using coloured glass blocks the entry of certain wavelengths of light (including ultraviolet), and thus certain nutritional and organoleptic characteristics remain unaltered.  
  • The type of closure of the container is also important as an airtight cap ensures that the food is protected from excessive contact with oxygen that can lead to lipid oxidation and encourage the growth of aerobic bacteria. 
  • The best kind of storage environment is one which is well ventilated because ventilating the premises keeps internal humidity under control, which otherwise could escape from windows, thereby guaranteeing the right balance to lessen the onset of mould.

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