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Macadamia Nuts View larger
Macadamia Nuts

Macadamia Nuts

Nuts

Buy online natural macadamia nuts with no added salt and no preservatives. 

Every raw material respects our entire supply chain guaranteeing a natural product at an affordable price. By purchasing our macadamia nuts you are supporting quality agriculture and people who work on the fields with love, effort and respect. 

You can buy macadamia nuts in packs of 500 g, 1 kg, and 2.5 kg, ideal for true nuts lovers.  

Discover the benefits of macadamia nuts! Our nutritional analyses have shown that 100 g of macadamia nuts contain: 

  • 19 mg of Manganese, 950% of NRV (Nutrient Reference Value)
  • 35 µg of Selenium, 64% of NRV
  • 0.49 mg of Copper, 49% of NRV

 

Ingredients: MACADAMIA NUTS

Formats: 500 g, 1 kg, 2.5 kg 

Origin:  Guatemala, Kenya, Australia, South Africa

More details

16,97 €

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Data sheet

IngredientsMACADAMIA NUTS. May contain traces of PEANUTS and other NUTS.
Weight1 kg, 2.5 kg, 500 g
Storage requirementsStore in a cool, dry place
Nutrition declarationaverage nutritional values per 100 g:
Energy3077 kJ / 747 kcal
Fats74 g
of which saturates13 g
Carbohydrate8.6 g
of which sugars4.6 g
Fibre7.9 g
Protein7.6 g
Salt0 g
Copper0.49 mg (49% NRV*)
Manganese19 mg (950% NRV*)
Selenium35 μg (64% NRV*)
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)1.78 mg (162% NRV*)
SourceEuro Company analysis
RecommendationsThe advice provided SHOULD IN NO WAY BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE OR PRESCRIPTION. The information provided shall be considered for informative and educational purposes only, it is not intended to replace medical advice. In case of a medical condition, always consult your doctor.
OriginAustralia, Guatemala, Kenya, South Africa
NutrientsManganese, Copper, Selenium
*NRV: Nutrient Reference Value*Nutrient Reference Value
Label and packagingThe images are for illustrative purposes only, the product may be subject to changes depending on stock availability and selected weight.
ProductNuts

More info

The macadamia nut tree is a perennial plant belonging to the Proteaceae family. It is native to the south-east Pacific and includes more than 10 species, although classification has not been completed yet. 

All species classified until now are native to eastern Australia except for Macadamia hildebrandii, which is native to Indonesia (Sulawesi). 

The main producers of macadamia nuts are Australia and Hawaii, where M. integrifolia is most widespread, while in South Africa and New Zealand it is M. tetraphylla that is best known, also because of the popularity of Tetraphylla Beaumont. 

Both species are plants that develop heights even greater than 20 metres and that, thanks to their dense crown of semi-spherical shape, are often present as shade plants in the gardens of Queensland and New South Wales. The plant produces numerous pinkish-white flowers, arranged in groups of 40-50 in hanging clusters of varying length between 5 and 30 cm. 

In Australia, flowering begins during the cold season when the days are short (May). Lignification of the shell starts at the beginning of December, followed by a rapid accumulation of oil between the end of December and the beginning of January. The period from full flowering to the complete maturation of nuts takes about 30 weeks. Ripe nuts fall to the ground between March and September and are harvested at regular intervals. 

They are very long-lived plants that can survive for more than a hundred years. Indeed, in the Brisbane Botanical Garden, you can admire a specimen that was planted in 1858. 

The trees are also used as ornamental plants in the subtropical regions because of their thick dense foliage and extremely beautiful flowers. 

Macadamia nuts are widely used in baking and as snacks, and can also add a tasty flavour when added to summer salads. This seed is also used as an ingredient in making ice cream, cookies, pastries, cakes, bread or added to muesli for breakfast. 

Macadamia oil extraction, which is carried out both by cold pressing and filtration, is done both for the food and cosmetic industry. Due to its high penetrative power, it is highly effective at preventing the skin from drying out. It's also a great massage oil. 

Some species of macadamia nut produce fruits which are unsuitable for human consumption - indeed, harmful - (M. whelanii and M. ternifolia), due to the presence of toxic glycoside. However, the toxic component can be removed by leaching, which is also practised by Indigenous Australians who use every species of macadamia. They are very long-lived plants that can survive for more than a hundred years. Indeed, in the Brisbane Botanical Garden, you can admire a specimen that was planted in 1858. Macadamia nuts have high energy value and are free of cholesterol. Its monounsaturated fat content is remarkable (about 78%) as it is much higher than any other natural oil, including olive oil. Macadamia oil extraction, which is carried out both by cold pressing and filtration, is done both for the food and cosmetic industry. The cold extraction process retains the characteristic smell and taste of the fruit. The oil has a very pleasant taste and does not exceed 2% acidity. Due to its great penetrative power, it is highly effective at preventing the skin from drying out. And it is also an excellent massage oil. 

Source: 

Nutspaper "La macadamia" 2/2008 

https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macadamia_integrifolia 

 

History

The macadamia nut tree is a perennial plant belonging to the Proteaceae family. It is native to the south-east Pacific and includes more than 10 species, although classification has not been completed yet.

All species classified until now are native to eastern Australia except for Macadamia hildebrandii, which is native to Indonesia (Sulawesi). It is said that, long before European explorers discovered Australia, the indigenous peoples of the eastern coasts ate the delicious seed of an evergreen plant called "Kindal Kindal" during their banquets.

During the mid-nineteenth century the majestic beauty of this plant, native to the tropical forest of Queensland, also attracted the attention of European botanists. Until then unknown to Europeans, the macadamia nut was discovered and classified between 1828 and 1860, although uncertainty about the correct taxonomy continued until 1956. The current theory is that the first European to have come into contact with the macadamia nut was Allan Cunningham in 1828.

The name of the genus Macadamia is a tribute to the famous Australian scientist John McAdam, a colleague of the British botanist Ferdinand von Mueller who was the first, along with Walter Hill (director of the Brisbane Botanical Garden), to describe this plant. It is to them that we owe the classification of the two most widespread species of macadamia: Macadamia integrifolia, with its smooth shell, and macadamia tetraphilla with a rough shell.

Although the first attempts at growing macadamia nuts in Australia go back to 1880, its shell's exceptional toughness created many problems and significantly delayed the introduction of automation into the processing of this fruit. It took until the middle of the twentieth-century before commercial cultivation became widespread in Australia in the territories of New South Wales and Queensland.

The macadamia nut is the only grown food crop native to Australia to be successfully exported to other parts of the world, although the credit for selecting the varieties most suitable for cultivation goes to the Americans. Indeed, in the early twentieth century it was a group of American growers who introduced this plant to Hawaii, where existing varieties were isolated, and successfully developed this business. Outside Australia, commercial production takes place in Hawaii (which is the largest producer after Australia), Brazil, California, Israel, Kenya, Bolivia, New Zealand, South Africa, and Malawi. 

 

Source: 

Nutspaper "La macadamia" 2/2008 

https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macadamia_integrifolia 

The advice provided SHOULD IN NO WAY BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE OR PRESCRIPTION. The information provided shall be considered for informative and educational purposes only, it is not intended to replace medical advice. In case of a medical condition, always consult your doctor. 

Properties

According to our analyses, 100 g of macadamia nuts contain:

  • Iron (2.1 mg – 15% NRV)
  • Vitamin B6 (0.22 mg – 16% NRV)
  • Thiamine (0.18 mg – 16% NRV)
  • Potassium (343 mg – 17% NRV)
  • Phosphorus (162 mg – 23% NRV)
  • Magnesium (109 mg – 29% NRV)
  • Copper (0.49 mg – 49% NRV)
  • Selenium (35 µg - 64% NRV)
  • Manganese (19 mg – 950% NRV)
  • Fibre (7.9 g)
  • Unsaturated fatty acids (63 g), monounsaturated (62 g) and oleic acid (46 g).

Please note that macadamia nuts are included in the list of allergens (Annex 2 Reg. No. 1169/2011 and as amended and extended.)

Dose recommendations

Each pack of 500 g of macadamia nuts contains about 17 portions of 30 g that provide: 

  • 280% of the Nutrient Reference Value of Manganese; 
  • 19% of the Nutrient Reference Value of Selenium; 
  • 15% of the Nutrient Reference Value of Copper. 

 
Individual needs will vary according to age, gender, weight and physical activity. A varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle are the basis of your well-being. 

Affordable price

Affordable price means to us offering our clients natural macadamia nuts with no added salt that everybody can enjoy. 
We want, on the one hand, to place the proper value on raw materials in order to obtain a quality product by paying our farmers a fair price; on the other hand, we want to fulfil your needs when it comes to pricing. 

We establish fair long-term relationships with our producers to avoid race-to-the-bottom pricing and that are based on trust as part of our efforts to offer you the finest and most natural product. 

Not only that: by choosing large packs of macadamia nuts you are also contributing to the reduction in the use of plastic. 

Storage

You can store macadamia nuts in cool, dry places away from heat and moisture. Here are 4 useful tips: 

  • The best way to store macadamia nuts is in a refrigerated environment. Nuturally macadamia nuts can also be stored at room temperature during the winter season due to low temperatures. During summer, however, it is advisable to store the product in the refrigerator or in the coolest possible environment as increased temperatures could encourage decay. 
  • The ideal container for the storage of macadamia nuts is glass. Indeed, because of its composition it is impervious to chemical agents and gases, and, as it has excellent insulation properties, it holds the initial temperature for longer than other materials. It is even better if the glass is coloured: using coloured glass blocks the entry of certain wavelengths of light (including ultraviolet), and thus certain nutritional and organoleptic characteristics remain unaltered.  
  • The type of closure of the container is also important as an airtight cap ensures that the food is protected from excessive contact with oxygen that can lead to lipid oxidation and encourage the growth of aerobic bacteria. 
  • The best kind of storage environment is one which is well ventilated because ventilating the premises keeps internal humidity under control, which otherwise could escape from windows, thereby guaranteeing the right balance to lessen the onset of mould.

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